Parables of Wisdom: How does One Become Wise?

wisdom

A young man came to a sage one day and asked, “Sire, what must I do to become wise?” The sage vouchsafed no answer. The youth after repeating his question a number of times, with a like result, at last left him, to return the next day with the same question. Again no answer was given and the youth returned on the third day, still repeating his question, “Sire what must I do to become wise?” Finally the sage turned and went down to a near-by river. He entered the water, bidding the youth follow him.

Upon arriving at a sufficient depth the sage took the young man by the shoulders and held him under the water, despite his struggles to free himself. At last, however, he released him and when the youth had regained his breath the sage questioned him: “Son, when you were under the water what did you most desire?” The youth answered without hesitation, “Air, air! I wanted air!” “Would you not rather have had riches, pleasure, power or love, my son? Did you not think of any of these?” queried the sage. “No, sire! I wanted air and thought only of air,” came the instant response. “Then,” said the sage, “To become wise you must desire wisdom with as great intensity as you just now desired air. You must struggle for it, to the exclusion of every other aim in life. It must be your one and only aspiration, by day and by night. If you seek wisdom with that fervor, my son, you will surely become wise.”

~ Taken from the book The Rosicrucian Cosmo-Conception by Max Heindel

Enlightening Documentaries: Alchemy – Sacred Secrets Revealed

alchemy_lab

In Alchemy – Sacred Secrets Revealed we take an in-depth look at this most Sacred Science, what are some of the myths, and how it relates to consciousness and spirituality. Alchemy has been shrouded in mystery and kept out of new adepts hands by secret societies, hermetic and fraternal orders for centuries.

In this film, we focus primarily on the spiritual aspects of Alchemy and Hermeticism.

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Wisdom Books: Seneca’s Epistles Volume III

Seneca_Epistles_Volume_3

The Epistulae morales ad Lucilium is a bundle of 124 letters which were written by Seneca the Younger at the end of his life. These letters all start with the phrase “Seneca Lucilio suo salutem” (Seneca greets his Lucilius) and end with the word “Vale” (Farewell). In these letters, Seneca gives Lucilius tips on how to become a more devoted Stoic. Lucilius was, at that time, the Governor of Sicily, although he is known only through Seneca’s writings. Some of the letters include “On Noise” and “Asthma”. Others include letters on “the influence of the masses” and “how to deal with one’s slaves”. Although they deal with Seneca’s eclectic form of Stoic philosophy, they also give us valuable insights in the daily life in ancient Rome.

-From Wikipedia

Volume 3 of 3 in the collection (Epistles 93-124)

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Wisdom Books: Seneca’s Epistles Volume II

Seneca_Epistles_Volume_2

The Epistulae morales ad Lucilium is a bundle of 124 letters which were written by Seneca the Younger at the end of his life. These letters all start with the phrase “Seneca Lucilio suo salutem” (Seneca greets his Lucilius) and end with the word “Vale” (Farewell). In these letters, Seneca gives Lucilius tips on how to become a more devoted Stoic. Lucilius was, at that time, the Governor of Sicily, although he is known only through Seneca’s writings. Some of the letters include “On Noise” and “Asthma”. Others include letters on “the influence of the masses” and “how to deal with one’s slaves”. Although they deal with Seneca’s eclectic form of Stoic philosophy, they also give us valuable insights in the daily life in ancient Rome.

-From Wikipedia

Volume 2 of 3 in the collection (Epistles 66-92)

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Quotes of Wisdom: Epictetus on the Love of Righteousness

Epictetus

What a person applies oneself to earnestly,
that one naturally loves.
Do people then apply themselves earnestly
to the things which are bad? By no means.
Well, do they apply themselves to things
which in no way concern themselves? Not to these either.
It remains, then, that they employ themselves earnestly
only about things which are good;
and if they are earnestly employed about things,
they love such things also.
Whoever, then, understands what is good,
can also know how to love;
but the one who cannot distinguish good from bad,
how can that one possess the power of loving?
To love, then, is only in the power of the wise.

~ Epictetus