Author Archives: Free Man

Quotes of Wisdom: Seneca on the True Meaning of Philosophy

Seneca

Demetrius the Cynic is fond of stating that it is better for us to possess only a few maxims of philosophy that are always at our command, than to acquire a vast knowledge that serves no practical purpose. It will not harm you to pass over matters which are neither possible nor advantageous to know. Truth is hidden and wrapped in mystery. There is nothing that is hard to discover except that which brings no other reward than the fact of discovery; all that makes us better and happier has been placed either in plain sight or nearby. The soul that can scorn the accidents of fortune, that can rise superior to fears, that does not covet boundless wealth, but has learned to seek riches in itself; the soul that can cast out dread of men and gods and knows that it has little to fear from man and nothing from Jupiter; that despising all things which, while they enrich, harass life, can rise to the height of seeing that death is not the source of evil, but the end of many; the soul that can dedicate itself to Virtue, and think that every path to which she calls is smooth; that social creature that is born for the common good views the world as the universal home of mankind and can bare its conscience to the gods. Such a soul, remote from storms, stands on solid ground beneath a blue sky and has attained to perfect knowledge of what is useful and essential. All other matters are but the diversions of a leisure hour; for once the soul has found a safe retreat it may also make excursions into things that bring polish, not strength, to its powers.

~ Seneca

Wisdom Books: None Dare Call It Conspiracy by Garry Allen

none_dare_call_it_conspiracy

This book is a primer for anyone who wishes to understand the basic workings of the global network of Insiders that is determined to wield power over all of mankind in the coming New World Order. The Special Edition is updated with illustrations and charts for 2013. Introduction by U.S. Congressman John G. Schmitz: The story you are about to read is true. The names have not been changed to protect the guilty. This book may have the effect of changing your life. After reading this book, you will never look at national and world events in the same way again.

None Dare Call It Conspiracy will be a very controversial book. At first it will receive little publicity and those whose plans are exposed in it will try to kill it by the silent treatment. For reasons that become obvious as you read this book, it will not be reviewed in all the “proper” places or be available on your local book stand. However, there is nothing these people can do to stop a grass roots book distributing system. Eventually it will be necessary for the people and organizations named in this book to try to blunt its effect by attacking it or the author. They have a tremendous vested interest in keeping you from discovering what they are doing. And they have the big guns of the mass media at their disposal to fire the barrages at None Dare Call It Conspiracy.

By sheer volume, the “experts” will try to ridicule you out of investigating for yourself as to whether or not the information in this book is true They will ignore the fact that the author about to conjecture. They will find a typographical error or argue some point that is open to debate. If necessary they will lie in order to protect themselves by smearing this book. I believe those who pooh-pooh the information herein because psychologically many people would prefer to believe we are because we all like to ignore bad news. We do so at our own peril.

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21 Precepts on Self-Discipline by Miyamoto Musashi

musashi

Dokkodo or “21 precepts on self-discipline to guide future generations”, also called “The Way of Walking Alone” or “The Way to be Followed Alone”

This work of Miyamoto Musashi was written in 1645, a week before his death, and was dedicated to his favourite student, Terao Magonojo.

  1. Accept everything just the way it is.
  2. Do not seek pleasure for its own sake.
  3. Do not, under any circumstances, depend on a partial feeling.
  4. Think lightly of yourself and deeply of the world.
  5. Be detached from desire your whole life long.
  6. Do not regret what you have done.
  7. Never be jealous.
  8. Never let yourself be saddened by a separation.
  9. Resentment and complaint are appropriate neither for oneself or others.
  10. Do not let yourself be guided by the feeling of lust or love.
  11. In all things have no preferences.
  12. Be indifferent to where you live.
  13. Do not pursue the taste of good food.
  14. Do not hold on to possessions you no longer need.
  15. Do not act following customary beliefs.
  16. Do not collect weapons or practice with weapons beyond what is useful.
  17. Do not fear death.
  18. Do not seek to possess either goods or fiefs for your old age.
  19. Respect Buddha and the gods without counting on their help.
  20. You may abandon your own body but you must preserve your honour.
  21. Never stray from the Way.