Tag Archives: Ancient Philosophers

Wisdom Books: Guides to Peace and Justice from Ancient Sages to the Suffragettes by Sanderson Beck

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Introduction

In the Atomic Age
the permanent political unification of mankind
on a literally world-wide scale
is evidently the only alternative that we have
to the infliction on ourselves of a catastrophe
of unprecedented and immeasurable dimensions.
All past attempts at establishing world peace
are therefore of topical interest for us today.
Arnold Toynbee, 1963

In 1851 Victor Hugo addressed the Peace Congress in Paris and prophesied that universal peace is inevitable when the nations are linked together by the Gospel that substitutes mediation for war. He proclaimed that the law of God is not war, but peace. He noted that before France was united, local regions fought each other often, and he predicted that the ballot box would unite the nations as well. The great novelist spoke prophetically when he said,

A day will come when there will be no more battlefields,
but markets opening to commerce and minds opening to ideas.
A day will come when the bullets and bombs
are replaced by votes, by universal suffrage,
by the venerable arbitration of a great supreme senate
which will be to Europe what Parliament is to England,
the Diet to Germany, and the Legislative Assembly to France.
A day will come when a cannon will be a museum-piece,
as instruments of torture are today.
And we will be amazed to think that these things once existed!
A day will come when we shall see those two immense groups,
the United States of America and the United States of Europe,
stretching out their hands across the sea,
exchanging their products, their arts, their works of genius,
clearing up the globe, making deserts fruitful,
ameliorating creation under the eyes of the Creator,
and joining together to reap the well-being of all.

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Wisdom Books: Rediscovering Plato by Norman D. Livergood

Rediscovering_Plato_Norman_Livergood

The Greek thinker Plato (428-348 BCE) speaks trenchantly to us today about twenty-first century barbarism,” writes author Norman D. Livergood in the introduction to Rediscovering Plato and the Mystical Science of Dialectic. “No other single thinker offers us the weapons to defeat contemporary oppression and ignorance.”A demonic cabal has seized power and imposed a fascistic dictatorship on the United States,” writes Livergood. “It is only when teachings like Plato’s dialogues become current again in the West that we will be able to rise above barbarity and depravity to a more enlightened existence.”Not only can Plato teach us how to withstand a constant barrage of propagandized power-plays, but Plato also provides esoteric Perennialist instructions for realizing our spiritual potential, which is even more important than struggling against despotism and benightedness. Plato helps us to rescue ourselves not only from political-economic-religious tyrants, but also from our own tyrannies: our mindless self-indulgence, our acquiescence to ignorance and self-satisfaction.

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Wisdom Books: Seneca’s Epistles Volume III

Seneca_Epistles_Volume_3

The Epistulae morales ad Lucilium is a bundle of 124 letters which were written by Seneca the Younger at the end of his life. These letters all start with the phrase “Seneca Lucilio suo salutem” (Seneca greets his Lucilius) and end with the word “Vale” (Farewell). In these letters, Seneca gives Lucilius tips on how to become a more devoted Stoic. Lucilius was, at that time, the Governor of Sicily, although he is known only through Seneca’s writings. Some of the letters include “On Noise” and “Asthma”. Others include letters on “the influence of the masses” and “how to deal with one’s slaves”. Although they deal with Seneca’s eclectic form of Stoic philosophy, they also give us valuable insights in the daily life in ancient Rome.

-From Wikipedia

Volume 3 of 3 in the collection (Epistles 93-124)

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Wisdom Books: Seneca’s Epistles Volume II

Seneca_Epistles_Volume_2

The Epistulae morales ad Lucilium is a bundle of 124 letters which were written by Seneca the Younger at the end of his life. These letters all start with the phrase “Seneca Lucilio suo salutem” (Seneca greets his Lucilius) and end with the word “Vale” (Farewell). In these letters, Seneca gives Lucilius tips on how to become a more devoted Stoic. Lucilius was, at that time, the Governor of Sicily, although he is known only through Seneca’s writings. Some of the letters include “On Noise” and “Asthma”. Others include letters on “the influence of the masses” and “how to deal with one’s slaves”. Although they deal with Seneca’s eclectic form of Stoic philosophy, they also give us valuable insights in the daily life in ancient Rome.

-From Wikipedia

Volume 2 of 3 in the collection (Epistles 66-92)

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