Tag Archives: Ancient Philosophy

Wisdom Books: Theosophy – A Modern Revival of Ancient Wisdom by Alvin Boyd Kuhn

A_Modern_Revival_of_Ancient_Wisdom

This work deals with the great renaissance of ancient Oriental Esotericism in the Western world in modern times. This book is an attempt to present a unified picture of the Theosophic movement in its larger aspects. Contents: Theosophy, An Ancient Tradition; The American Background of Theosophy; Helena P. Blavatsky: Her Life and Psychic Career; From Spiritualism to Theosophy; Isis Unveiled; The Mahatmas and Their Letters; Storm, Wreck, and Rebuilding; The Secret Doctrine; Evolution, Rebirth, and Karma; Esoteric Wisdom and Physical Science; Theosophy in Ethical Practice; Later Theosophical History; Some Facts and Figures; Bibliography.

Read more …

Wisdom Books: Seneca’s Epistles Volume III

Seneca_Epistles_Volume_3

The Epistulae morales ad Lucilium is a bundle of 124 letters which were written by Seneca the Younger at the end of his life. These letters all start with the phrase “Seneca Lucilio suo salutem” (Seneca greets his Lucilius) and end with the word “Vale” (Farewell). In these letters, Seneca gives Lucilius tips on how to become a more devoted Stoic. Lucilius was, at that time, the Governor of Sicily, although he is known only through Seneca’s writings. Some of the letters include “On Noise” and “Asthma”. Others include letters on “the influence of the masses” and “how to deal with one’s slaves”. Although they deal with Seneca’s eclectic form of Stoic philosophy, they also give us valuable insights in the daily life in ancient Rome.

-From Wikipedia

Volume 3 of 3 in the collection (Epistles 93-124)

Read more …

Wisdom Books: Seneca’s Epistles Volume II

Seneca_Epistles_Volume_2

The Epistulae morales ad Lucilium is a bundle of 124 letters which were written by Seneca the Younger at the end of his life. These letters all start with the phrase “Seneca Lucilio suo salutem” (Seneca greets his Lucilius) and end with the word “Vale” (Farewell). In these letters, Seneca gives Lucilius tips on how to become a more devoted Stoic. Lucilius was, at that time, the Governor of Sicily, although he is known only through Seneca’s writings. Some of the letters include “On Noise” and “Asthma”. Others include letters on “the influence of the masses” and “how to deal with one’s slaves”. Although they deal with Seneca’s eclectic form of Stoic philosophy, they also give us valuable insights in the daily life in ancient Rome.

-From Wikipedia

Volume 2 of 3 in the collection (Epistles 66-92)

Read more …