Tag Archives: Ancient Philosophy

Wisdom Books: Seneca’s Epistles Volume III

Seneca_Epistles_Volume_3

The Epistulae morales ad Lucilium is a bundle of 124 letters which were written by Seneca the Younger at the end of his life. These letters all start with the phrase “Seneca Lucilio suo salutem” (Seneca greets his Lucilius) and end with the word “Vale” (Farewell). In these letters, Seneca gives Lucilius tips on how to become a more devoted Stoic. Lucilius was, at that time, the Governor of Sicily, although he is known only through Seneca’s writings. Some of the letters include “On Noise” and “Asthma”. Others include letters on “the influence of the masses” and “how to deal with one’s slaves”. Although they deal with Seneca’s eclectic form of Stoic philosophy, they also give us valuable insights in the daily life in ancient Rome.

-From Wikipedia

Volume 3 of 3 in the collection (Epistles 93-124)

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Wisdom Books: Seneca’s Epistles Volume II

Seneca_Epistles_Volume_2

The Epistulae morales ad Lucilium is a bundle of 124 letters which were written by Seneca the Younger at the end of his life. These letters all start with the phrase “Seneca Lucilio suo salutem” (Seneca greets his Lucilius) and end with the word “Vale” (Farewell). In these letters, Seneca gives Lucilius tips on how to become a more devoted Stoic. Lucilius was, at that time, the Governor of Sicily, although he is known only through Seneca’s writings. Some of the letters include “On Noise” and “Asthma”. Others include letters on “the influence of the masses” and “how to deal with one’s slaves”. Although they deal with Seneca’s eclectic form of Stoic philosophy, they also give us valuable insights in the daily life in ancient Rome.

-From Wikipedia

Volume 2 of 3 in the collection (Epistles 66-92)

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Wisdom Books: The Stoic’s Bible by Giles Laurén

Quotations from Greek and Roman philosophers that illustrate the origins and practice of Stoicism and the pursuit of the Good Life. A complete course in Stoicism including cultural background, chronology, examples, and Arrian’s notes. Largest source for classical quotations. Aide memoire to locate a given text or idea.

The following passages is an excerpt from The Stoic’s Bible:

THE SEVEN SAGES
6th c. B.C.

SOURCE: as noted.

On being asked what is difficult: To know oneself. What is easy? To give advice to another. What is pleasant? Success. What is divine? That which has neither beginning nor end. The strangest thing he had ever seen? An aged tyrant. Thales of Miletus. D.L.I. pp.37, 39.

How shall we lead the best and most righteous life? By refraining from doing what we blame in others. Thales. D.L.I. p.39.

To Thales belongs the proverb: KNOW THYSELF. D.L.I. p.41.

One should say what is probable and shroud in silence that which is impossible. Thales. PL. Mor .2, p.429. Read more …

Wisdom Books: The Emerald Tablets of Thoth

The history of the tablets translated in the following pages is strange and beyond the belief of modern scientists. Their antiquity is stupendous, dating back some 36,000 years B.C. The writer is Thoth, an Atlantean Priest-King, who founded a colony in ancient Egypt after the sinking of the mother country. He was the builder of the Great Pyramid of Giza, erroneously attributed to Cheops. In it he incorporated his knowledge of the ancient wisdom and also securely secreted records and instruments of ancient Atlantis.

For some 16,000 years, he ruled the ancient race of Egypt, from approximately 52,000 B.C. to 36,000 B.C. At that time, the ancient barbarous race among which he and his followers had settled had been raised to a high degree of civilization. Thoth was an immortal, that is, he had conquered death, passing only when he willed and even then not through death. His vast wisdom made him ruler over the various Atlantean colonies, including the ones in South and Central America.

When the time came for him to leave Egypt, he erected the Great Pyramid over the entrance to the Great Halls of Amenti, placed in it his records, and appointed guards for his secrets from among the highest of his people.

In later times, the descendants of these guards became the pyramid priests, by which Thoth was deified as the God of Wisdom, The Recorder, by those in the age of darkness which followed his passing. In legend, the Halls of Amenti became the underworld, the Halls of the gods, where the soul passed after death for judgment.

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