Tag Archives: buddhism

21 Precepts on Self-Discipline by Miyamoto Musashi

musashi

Dokkodo or “21 precepts on self-discipline to guide future generations”, also called “The Way of Walking Alone” or “The Way to be Followed Alone”

This work of Miyamoto Musashi was written in 1645, a week before his death, and was dedicated to his favourite student, Terao Magonojo.

  1. Accept everything just the way it is.
  2. Do not seek pleasure for its own sake.
  3. Do not, under any circumstances, depend on a partial feeling.
  4. Think lightly of yourself and deeply of the world.
  5. Be detached from desire your whole life long.
  6. Do not regret what you have done.
  7. Never be jealous.
  8. Never let yourself be saddened by a separation.
  9. Resentment and complaint are appropriate neither for oneself or others.
  10. Do not let yourself be guided by the feeling of lust or love.
  11. In all things have no preferences.
  12. Be indifferent to where you live.
  13. Do not pursue the taste of good food.
  14. Do not hold on to possessions you no longer need.
  15. Do not act following customary beliefs.
  16. Do not collect weapons or practice with weapons beyond what is useful.
  17. Do not fear death.
  18. Do not seek to possess either goods or fiefs for your old age.
  19. Respect Buddha and the gods without counting on their help.
  20. You may abandon your own body but you must preserve your honour.
  21. Never stray from the Way.

Wisdom Books: The Word of The Buddha by Nyanatiloka Thero

the-word-of-the-buddha-1

The Word of the Buddha, published originally in German, was the first strictly systematic exposition of all the main tenets of the Buddha’s Teachings presented in the Master’s own words as found in the Sutta-Pitaka of the Buddhist Pali Canon.

While it may well serve as a first introduction for the beginner, its chief aim is to give the reader who is already more or less acquainted with the fundamental ideas of Buddhism, a clear, concise and authentic summary of its various doctrines, within the framework of the all-embracing `Four Noble Truths,’ i.e. the Truths of Suffering (inherent in all existence), of its Origin, of its Extinction, and of the Way leading to its extinction. From the book itself it will be seen how the teachings of the Buddha all ultimately converge upon the one final goal: Deliverance from Suffering.

Read more …

Enlightening Documentaries: Zen: The Best of Alan Watts

“But the transformation of consciousness undertaken in Taoism and Zen is more like the correction of faulty perception or the curing of a disease. It is not an acquisitive process of learning more and more facts or greater and greater skills, but rather an unlearning of wrong habits and opinions. As Lao-tzu said, “The scholar gains every day, but the Taoist loses every day.” ~ Alan Watts

Alan Watts (1915-1973) who held both a master’s degree in theology and a doctorate of divinity, is best known as an interpreter of Zen Buddhism in particular, and Indian and Chinese philosophy in general. He authored more than 20 excellent books on the philosophy and psychology of religion, and lectured extensively, leaving behind a vast audio archive. With characteristic lucidity and humor Watts unravels the most obscure ontological and epistemological knots with the greatest of ease.

Read more …

Buddha’s Ten Steps Of Wisdom Towards Spiritual Zen

The following ten steps towards Spiritual Zen was taken from the Manly P. Hall lecture ‘Spirit of Zen’.

Each experience proves itself as we progress so that at no time are we required to accept any belief or idea that we’ve not already discovered to be true, thus we actually lead and guide ourselves.

All we require is sincerity and a little courage, and these will become stronger as we experience their benefits.

Our discovery of the practical values of Zen unfolds according to a pattern of ten steps:

Read more …